Peated Amrut Black Adder Single Cask Bottling

Peated Amrut Black Adder Single Cask Bottling

Peated Amrut Black Adder Single Cask Bottling

Hello all and how’s it going? It’s been a while. I had to take a break, but I hope you didn’t mind it. At the same time, I’ve got something very interesting for you.
A while back, I had the chance to meet the really cool Raj Sabharwhal (Twitter @whiskyraj) of Purple Valley Imports. Raj is the reason why Amrut Whiskies and a host of other world whiskies have entered the US market. Raj introduced me to Amrut and different varieties of it when we met up in Pittsburgh. At that time, he told me about a special bottling of Amrut available through Black Adder- and I just had to have it. And let me tell you a little about it…

Peated Amrut Black Adder Bottling
Peated Amrut Black Adder Bottling © 2016 dMann’s Whisky Pages

Let’s take a look at the label. There’s a lot to read here on the label. It says Black Adder Single Cask Peated Amrut Indian Single Malt Whisky distilled at Amrut Distillery Bangalore. It was matured in an oak cask and the cask reference number is BA19/2014. It was bottled in Scotland in September 2014 and this is bottle number 75 of 138. It is 58.1% ABV or 16.2 proof. It also says NO CHILL FILTRARTION & NO COLORING and has a sherry cask finish. It is produced in India and selected and bottled by Black Adder International. Oh yea, there’s also no age statement on this bottle. Now that was a lot on the label. So I think it’s time to pour out a dram.
On pouring it out, you immediately notice how dark it is… Dark amber! It’s amazing how dark it its, especially when you note that there is no coloring added. There is a strong cling ring and slow legs.
On nosing the dram, you immediately get a strong olfactory sensations- some traditional whisky notes, and some not so traditional. Notes of sherry, oak, caramel, peat, cream and vanilla. There are some notes of banana and is it tamarind? There’s also another sweet note- somewhat reminding me of rum. Very complex. Very interesting.
I take a sip and immediately note the peat, oak and sherry notes. There are notes of vanilla, cream, caramel, and chocolate. I continue to the get the rum notes. Almost reminds of Old Monk.
I add a few drops of water and nose it again. The cream, caramel, and chocolate notes increase. The oak, vanilla, and sherry notes continue. I take a sip and notice that on tasting, the cream and caramel notes diminish giving way to stronger vanilla, oak, and rum notes.
The finish is very clean and very long. There’s a paradox here that it feels velvety but there’s a nice astringent factor to the finish. There are long lasting notes of peat and sherry.
Before I give you my final thoughts, I just want to say that if you’ve read this far, I want to thank you so much for doing so. It means a lot to me that all of you would take time to read my blog. I ask that if you like what you’ve read, then please share this with others via social media so they may enjoy this as well.
So… my thoughts? I give this dram a score of 95 out of 100 points. I thought it was an amazing dram. It is definitely a lot costlier than the budgets I usually keep for whiskies, but I think it was definitely worth it. It was extremely complex and extremely enjoyable. It truly showcased what can be done with whiskies from around the world. This is a beautiful and complex single malt.  The sherry cask brings an added dimension to the regular Peated Amrut.  I found it interesting that it was chosen to be bottled in Scotland.  It is very impressive, for me at least, that an Indian whisky has become so popular and recognized throughout the world.

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